War in Ukraine

3 minute read 04 May 2022

The following was written by @JulianCoffee, an active contributor to Veloren

On 24th February, in Kyiv I woke up earlier than usual because my parents were chaotically searching something in closets.
My uncle in town near Kyiv, who left Russia years ago, woke up earlier than usual because of sounds of explosions and was trying to leave his home.
My grandfather in town near Kherson woke up earlier than usual because of sound of Russian tanks moving.
Millions of people in Ukraine woke up earlier than usual that day, because Russia went for full-scale war against Ukraine.

Do you know what war looks like?
Imagine that 9/11 happens multiple times per day in hundred of towns.
Imagine that people leaving its home to save their families.
Imagine that in blocked cities people don't have water, roof, medicine and food.
Imagine that children became orphans because their father was killed by enemy soldier and his mother was raped and then killed.
There is no war without war crimes, like in Bucha.
If you can't imagine that, that probably good at least for you.

At first day I explored shelters near my home. While I was coming from one of them, I heard sound of flying missile. People run in panic back to shelter. And I should say that sound of flying missile is just sound of something moving fast, so I was in fear for my life each time I heard regular car moving.

At second day when I heard sound of air alarm, I run to shelter and I saw helicopter moving above us. And the most scary thing is that I had no idea which side this helicopter belongs to and whether I will be able to run to shelter or will die right there. When I got to shelter I was told that helicopter was Ukrainian helicopter specialised on emergency situations.

For me the war is just pure chaos and understanding that most elementary things might vanish. At second day I didn't have electricity and most markets were closed, partly because workers were scared of leaving their houses, partly because people bought everything at first day and logistic to deliver food just died as everything else. By some luck, I managed to leave Kyiv at second day and move to West of Ukraine. I can't return to my home, but I want it so much.

If you want to help Ukraine and stop this war, you can in multiple ways!

  • Please, call this war, not "conflict" or "military operation". Yes, word "war" is scary as it is.
  • You can donate, for example here or here. Don't donate to International Committee of the Red Cross, because it's unclear were money will go. Maybe to Russia? ("International" part is important, there are different ones, like Ukrainian Red Cross Society)
  • Boycott companies that sponsor Russia by continuing working there, like Leroy Merlin.
  • Go for protests, asking your government for stronger actions.

Слава Україні! Жыве Беларусь!